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Last week was pie, this week it’s cake!  This is my grandmother’s recipe

Nonnie’s Rhubarb Cake

½ c shortening

1 ½ cups sugar

2 eggs Mix well

Sift:            2 cups flour

½ teas. Salt

1 teas. Soda

Add alternately with

1 cup buttermilk (I used yogurt today, since I didn’t have any buttermilk)

Beat well and fold in rhubarb

Sprinkle over top of cake the following:

1 cup brown sugar

½ tsp cinnamon

Bake in a well greased and floured 9X 10 pan for 40-45 minutes at 350 degrees.

2 or 3 cups of rhubarb should be cut in length once then in pieces about an inch long.

(Today I also added a couple of cut up, sliced apricots, because I had them nearby- they made for a nice variation on this simple cake, which is almost like  a pineapple upside down cake recipe).

We always had this cake, and other simple homemade desserts when we were growing up.  We often froze quantities of rhubarb in the spring so we were able to make rhubarb cake all through the year.  But of course, it was always wonderful when it went right from your garden into the kitchen and into whatever you happened to be cooking.  We also took the fresh rhubarb stalks and dipped the ends in sugar, which was a very big treat for very small children.

I almost forgot to tell you.  I nearly destroyed this cake- after more than 30 years in the kitchen. The oven was at 300, instead of 350, so I turned up the heat to almost 400, on and off for about 5 minutes.  It survived pretty well, which says something about the recipe and not the baker.

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quick cinn rolls

quick cinn rolls

*2 c all purpose flour, 1/2 t salt, 2-1/2 t baking powder, 1/2 t baking soda, 2 T sugar- whisk these all together quickly and cut in finely  1/4 cup of shortening (butter, veg. shortening, etc)- you can use a food processor to reduce these steps to about 1 minute of work.

* 1 egg in a 1-cup measuring cup, yogurt to fill the cup; and a splash of milk or buttermilk to make a dough almost too soft to handle.

Lightly and quickly mix the wet and dry together in a bowl with a spoon, your hand or a spatula; press lightly down into a rectangle and spread with a couple Tbsp of soft butter- sprinkle with brown sugar (1/2 c- 2/3 cup I’d say) a tsp cinnamon, dried fruit if you like- and roll everything up.  I always use a heavy canvas pastry cloth to roll/pat dough out, and I often use the pastry cloth to help roll up the dough and filling together- kind of like how you roll up a traditional jelly roll.

If you made the dough with the minimum of mixing, it will be difficult to handle.  Don’t worry, it’s supposed to be that way.  Cut the roll in half, and then in half again- and then each quarter by three.  You’ll have a dozen soft, squishy, nearly formless swirls of cinnamon roll dough that I can almost guarantee will be difficult to get onto a baking sheet.   Figure out a way to plop them closely together, so they sort of prop each other up and bake them at 425F for about 15 minutes.  They will be tender enough to melt in the mouth- they will be frustrating to make the first few times, but when you crave a homemade cinnamon roll, this is as fast and tastes far far better than any convenience product you can get out of the refrigerator case at the grocery store.